How To Quit Your Job

How To Quit Your Job by Scott Curry

This week I did something terrifying for the first time in my life: I quit my job. 

This is/was my first “big boy” job with a salary, benefits, and all of that. Even quitting serving jobs was never easy, so how the hell was I supposed to not have a panic attack before/during/after putting in my notice?

The company I’m leaving has been working closely with a business veteran who specializes in being a badass. Not only is she one of the most business savvy people I’ve ever met, she’s also incredibly caring and compassionate. So naturally, I went to her for guidance, and this is what she told me. 

1. Don’t Apologize

It’s hard to think that you’re not going to upset people by leaving your job – and I’m sure you will – but you should never apologize. (This one was hard for me.)

Chances are, you are taking a new position to continue growing in the direction that’s right for you. The money and the perks are probably better, sure, but growth is equally (if not more) important. 

People come and go, and businesses adapt. There’s genuinely nothing to apologize for. I’m not sorry for leaving. I’m actually really, really excited for the new chapter. 

2. Keep It Positive

I’m not your everyday Negative Nancy by far, but I’ll be damned if I’m not a people pleaser. I try to keep everything as neutral as possible in hopes of keeping emotions low, when it fact, I should be focusing on the positive. 

Sure, you leaving creates some gaps, but it’s more exciting than anything else. And the position you’re leaving helped prepare you for your path forward. 

So just remember. This is all very positive, so keep it positive. 

3. Stay Strong, Don’t Compromise

Like I’ve said, you’re going somewhere for a reason. And chances are, you might be offered an incentive or two for staying. 

These offers will be enticing, yes, but the purpose of finding a new job is to take off in a new direction, not the same one with a different set of glasses on. 

4. Keep Secrets

It’s not so much that you need to keep secrets, but it is absolutely within your rights to keep some information private until you are ready to share. 

No matter what anyone says, it is not important for your current company to know where you are going, what the pay difference is, what the new company does, or the new perks involved. 
This one is easier said that done, but please have faith knowing that it truly is 1000% acceptable to keep some information to yourself.

Just keep reminding yourself and whoever is asking that the decision has been made, and you are moving forward in your career. (And remember not to apologize along the way.)

5. Give Credit Where Credit Is Due

One tactic that helped me stay positive was giving credit where credit was due. 

“The bad news is that I have accepted a position at a new company. The good news is that it better aligns with my career path, and it would have absolutely not been possible without this opportunity and all of your help along the way.”

That’s nearly verbatim how I handled it. 

6. Keep Your Head In The Game Until The Game is Over

It’s going to be easy to mentally check out while you round out your final days / weeks. 

You have to not do that. You owe a lot to your current position, even if it was just the paycheck that kept you going. 

But you gotta keep your head in the game until the end. You owe your company and the person(s) fulfilling your role that respect. Don’t leave anyone hanging. 

(And trust me. Your two weeks will go by MUCH faster this way.)

Whew

So that’s how I quit my job. I’m not sorry. And I’m extremely excited for this new chapter in my life. 

What about you? Have you ever had a GOOD experience with quitting a job?